Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Geraghty nails it...

Jim Geraghty has something everyone should read. It's reading I'd recommend to Glenn Beck and Erick Erickson, in fact.

So, just to review... we've got a Republican who is a member of the National Guard for 30 years and a practing attorney — how that translates to "career politician" is beyond me — who is actually within striking distance of winning Ted Kennedy's seat. He would be the vote that restores the filibuster; Democrats are openly talking about his election meaning the end of ObamaCare; with it would probably go cap-and-trade, Card Check, perhaps amnesty, the continuance of bailout nation, raising the debt limits, and so on. It would be the biggest psychological blow to big-government liberalism since the 1994 Republican Revolution, and probably trigger another slew of Democratic congressional retirements.

But he didn't vote the right way every time, and so now we're going to throw away the political upset of the century, an allow Martha Coakley to win with a plurality, because the third-party option polling in the single digits checks all the boxes on the checklist.

I don't think that Joe Kennedy, the independent, is going to get enough votes to be a factor in the race. But if he does - and if conservatives voting for him over issues like this make the difference and put Coakley in the seat... well, at a certain point, you begin to wonder if your political movement has enough strategic sense to be worth participating in, or whether it's all a waste of time.

The opportunity to "radically increase the number of TRUE tax cut and spending cut candidates on the ballot this November" sounds great, but some of us would like to #%*@$ stop ObamaCare before then.

Erickson's jihad against Senator Bennett, and Glenn Beck saying both parties are the problem miss the big point. Worse, how are those who DO work hard for a Scott Brown to know they can trust Erickson and Beck when the going gets tough?

I'm someone who thinks that The 5000 Year Leap gets it more right than not. I tend to lean to the right. But at the same time, I do despair of conservatives showing any semblance of a grasp of the need for things like strategy and long-term thinking. Beck has made the effort with the 100-year plan he has talked about, but aside from him, it's been absent more often than not.

The right, it seems, never misses the chance to miss a chance.